Opinion

2015: The year of the pro-life woman

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I don’t know what you’re up to next week, but I’m going to Washington, D.C.

There’s this little thing you might have heard about happening next Saturday in Our Nation’s Capital called the March for Life. A few people are gonna stop by and rap with the rest of the country about a few things. (Yes, that was a Ghostbusters reference. You’re welcome.)

If you’re there, say hi. I shouldn’t be that hard to pick out of the crowd. I’ll be the one in the coat.

I’ll be in D.C. as a representative of New Wave Feminists. Not just the few thousand of us who meet online to post Fiona the Feminist Fetus memes, but women all over the world who may not even know they’re New Wave Feminists.

(You might even be one and not know it.)

On behalf of pro-life feminists — and on behalf of women everywhere — we are headed to the capital to celebrate 2015 as the Year of the Woman.

We celebrate the Year of the Woman because it’s about time we celebrate womanhood in its every aspect. For too long we have celebrated either/or: either a woman’s feminity, beauty, charm, and fertility or her strength, intelligence, independence, and spirit.

Either her ability to try a case, fly a plane, run a country — or her ability to nurture a baby, run a household, serve her family.

This year the pro-life feminist asks: why not both?

Not only is it time to recognize that women are capable of all these things — and more — but it’s time to recognize that we can’t honestly celebrate womanhood in one aspect without acknowledging and rejoicing in the others.

In other words: we can’t honestly celebrate womanhood at the expense of manhood or childhood or babyhood.

In 2015, it’s time to affirm that a woman can be powerful — without denying that a woman can be nurturing.

We need to acknowledge that a woman can be independent without denying that a woman can be fertile.

In the Year of the Woman, we want it all. We want to be passionate and rational, just and empathetic, feminine and strong.

The message of pro-life feminism is that we don’t have to sacrifice our intelligence or independence at the altar of what our society expects of us as women, nor will we sacrifice our fertility at the altar of what society expects of us as feminists.

Many years ago, American women began to liberate themselves from a culture in which they were seen as property. Today, we continue that struggle in solidarity with women in cultures where they still have no rights and are abused, maimed, and killed. In our culture, we face an alarming and expanding struggle against the objectification of women through pornography and the sex trades — legal and illegal — and the commodification of women’s bodies in media and advertising.

We have equality in many ways, but we are still expected to be silent — or worse, to be delighted — when, for example, our partners want to look at pornography; or the body parts of women are used to sell cola, condoms, or cars; or our daughters’ role models in film and music portray wrapping themselves around stripper poles as the ultimate fate to which young women can aspire; or — worst of all — when the “sacrament” of abortion is touted in journalism and popular media as the “get out of jail free” card that erases mistakes and leaves ones future intact.

If we are truly committed to the dignity of the woman as a human being worthy of justice and respect, we cannot deny that dignity to our children.

Mainstream “fauxminism” as we know it today has been perverted by women who believe that the key to our liberation is becoming as much like men as possible. These women to this day will tell you that we are not liberated unless we use men in the same way the worst of men use women. And just as the worst of men believe that a woman is an object to be used and thrown away, so women in turn began to treat their fertility and even their children the same way: as disposable, inconvenient objects — not as human beings worthy of life and dignity.

In 2015, the Year of the Woman, many of us have dreams and goals and aspirations that will take us outside the home and around the world, but we will not deny the natural functions of our bodies or souls.

As pro-life feminists, we are through with wounding ourselves, body and soul, with pills, patches, inserted devices, and the affront to humanity that is abortion.

As pro-life feminists, we will no longer crush our bodies and souls into the shape society wants them to be.

It is the Year of the Woman. It is the year of the New Wave Feminist, and we invite all women and men, of all creeds and nations, to join us in a renewed commitment to the dignity of all human life.

So if you can’t be in D.C. next week with us in body, go there in spirit. Take this opportunity to renew your passion for pro-life feminism. Be bold in your love for the unborn. Be unabashed in your commitment to making the world a better place for women and girls — in the womb and beyond.

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