Opinion

Abortion as a political issue, because it is one

Making politics more reflective of our morals.

I became a Republican because I wanted to be more involved in a party that I felt most reflected my views on one of the most key issues out there: the right to life. I sympathize with the plight of pro-life Democrats, and I am ready and willing to accept any person into the pro-life movement, but I can only imagine what it’s like to affiliate with a political party whose platform could hardly agree less with the right to life. Of course, I also acknowledge that pro-lifers come from many walks of life, from any political party affiliation to no political party affiliation.

I would say that we need more people like myself in both the pro-life movement and political change. I have come across pro-lifers who have resisted getting involved in politics altogether, and Republicans who barely want to go near the issue of abortion, or worse, who are pro-choice. But from my experience with the two clubs during my time at Fordham University, I do believe that the glory days of both Fordham’s Respect for Life (the pro-life club on campus) and Fordham College Republicans was when the two groups actually had a connection with each other, having many members in both clubs, and stood for many of the same pro-life values.

I someday hope to run for office, whether it be in House of Representatives or Senate of my state, or for the presidency of the United States of America. Because I don’t want to stop where I am currently with my pro-life activities, I actually want to sponsor, vote on, and hopefully pass pro-life legislation that really affects this country.

And so long as we still have elected officials who agree with our views and uphold the right to life, we should welcome the issue of abortion being addressed in politics! For those elected officials who do not uphold our views, or who stray from them, we can hold them accountable and vote them out of office, and vote real pro-lifers in. Our elected officials should know that America cares about the issue of abortion, and not toss it to the side. We should also at the same time encourage those candidates who do fight for the right to life.

If we are to see some sort of change at the national level, which we should want to see, then we need to become more involved in abortion and politics. For if we work on electing more pro-life politicians, it is my hope and belief that we will see change in the direction we want.

I admire those good people who seek every day to change hearts and minds by sidewalk-counseling women and volunteering at crisis pregnancy centers. I believe that I am called to impact the issue on a different, more political level, though, and I need not be the only one. Making abortion a political issue can help to pass laws at the local and state levels, but also at the national level. A president’s view on abortion is an indication as to whether he will sign or veto pro-life or pro-abortion legislation, and let us not forget that he nominates justices to the U.S. Supreme Court who may someday uphold or overturn Roe v. Wade. 

The other side seems to have no problem getting political. Planned Parenthood spent $15 million to re-elect Obama. As Susan Michelle Tyrrell pointed out, back when that figure was $12 million, this is an organization supported in part by our tax dollars, even by those who want no part in politics:

Hey, America, do you know what you’re funding with government money when you give to “women’s health” via Planned Parenthood? You think I’m going to say abortion, don’t you? I don’t actually need to say that since you’d have to be brain dead not to know that part. How about to Barack Obama’s re-election? Wait you say! Not us! We give my money to Planned Parenthood because women’s health is important. Our tax dollars should support this crucial organization. Well, don’t look now, but you look like the silver-haired matron of the abortion industry, Cecile Richards.

She then goes on to discuss how Cecile Richards took time off from her job at Planned Parenthood to go campaign for Obama. And yet Planned Parenthood affiliates are the ones who cry out to “STOP playing politics with women’s health care!” when it comes to voting on bills.

Abortion is indeed a moral issue. And to quote Marco Rubio, it also “is a fundamental issue.” But that does not mean it cannot be a political issue as well. If we are to truly get somewhere with affecting abortion at the national level, we should make it political. I say we must. And consider this: if we are to make this fundamental, moral issue more political, are we merely making abortion political, or are we making it so that politics is more reflective of our morals? I choose to see it as the latter.

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