Opinion

Abortion not so “safe,” as Minnesota governor vetoes bill

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I had high hopes when reading just over a week ago that a Minnesota Legislative Panel had approved the state health department to inspect abortion clinics and require them to be licensed. Imagine my disappointment late yesterday.

I had high hopes when reading just over a week ago that a Minnesota Legislative Panel had approved the state health department to inspect abortion clinics and require them to be licensed. I myself tweeted the article along with my thoughts on how abortion clinics must be held accountable! I mean, this makes sense, and not just because I am pro-life. One has to wonder, why would anyone be against state health inspections or licensing? There are plenty of things in the medical world that are inspected and have to be licensed, and we should all be grateful for it. I really cannot fathom how anyone would be against something that is already in place, especially when it comes to protecting women.

I would love to hear what the abortion industry has to say about all of this, because in my mind, I can’t think of a reason for anyone to be against a bill that allows the state health department to inspect a clinic in practice. The only reasons which come to my mind involve laziness, or the abortion industry being in the frame of mind that they are above being beholden to the rules the rest of us have to abide by.

But then my high hopes were dashed when I read late yesterday that Governor Mark Dayton actually vetoed such a bill. We can have our own separate conversation about why veto power is a good thing or a bad thing. But in this case, it is very much a bad thing.

I am getting sick of this whole “War on Women” thing. Not because it doesn’t exist, because it does. It exists for those unborn women who the abortion industry pretends don’t exist. It exists for those women whose religious freedom are being denied when they are forced to pay for contraception and other forms of so-called “preventive care” against their religious or moral beliefs. And, with Governor Dayton now vetoing a bill that would ensure that women receive such an already potential dangerous procedure in a clinic that had health inspection,  it seems there’s a war on women who do wish to have an abortion performed but may never know the further health risks they may be getting themselves into.

The article from LifeNews about Governor Dayton’s decision points out that these health risks aren’t just made up. The Minnesota Legislative Panel was driven to come up with such a bill after a described “house of horrors” clinic in Pennsylvania did not pass inspection. The clinic did not license or have inspections, and not so surprisingly but unfortunately, women died or contracted venereal diseases from unsanitary equipment, and babies born alive were then murdered by having their spinal cords cut.

When people try to denounce my pro-life view, they point out that if abortion were made illegal in this country, women would still get abortions, but they would just be unsafe. I need only point to the unspeakably unsafe and horrific abortions that happened in that clinic in Pennsylvania, and which may happen in Minnesota now. Abortion is legal, but it’s not rare, and it actually is becoming less safe.

One has to wonder then about Governor Dayton and whom he is truly serving. Did someone lobby him to veto this bill? Was he afraid that he would lose support? And if so, is this the support of actual voters or of the abortion industry, who for some reason continue to believe that their accountability is different from that of the rest of us? Because to me, it doesn’t seem like Governor Dayton is serving the women of Minnesota.

These stories about unsanitary abortion clinics are sad and gruesome, but true. Women, of course, deserve better than the lies that the abortion industry sells. But unfortunately, the fact of the matter remains that women are still getting abortions in this country. There is already one innocent life dying; why should another die at the hands of negligence and unsanitary conditions? It’s because the government is too afraid or too lazy to make the effort to ensure that something which is legal is held accountable. The abortion industry does not have special privileges in this country above the rest of medical practices, especially when it’s a so-called one at that. It needs to stop acting like it does.

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