All posts by Laura Peredo

Laura, a junior Business Management major at Benedictine College, loves people regardless of race, gender, belief system, or actions. That's why she joined the movement to promote the dignity of every human person, and continues to devote her time to it. She believes every person possesses the inherent right to life, and works to expose injustices against life and the authentic living out of our call to be the person we were made to be. Follow her blog at: asingledropintheocean.com
madison-tevlin

Girl with Down Syndrome defies statistics

Though we’ve moved away from institutionalizing people who have Down Syndrome or other forms of so-called disabilities, we don’t all have the opportunity to know someone who is disabled. Perhaps this is because the vast majority of people diagnosed prenatally are aborted.

Now you have a chance. Allow me to introduce you to Madison.

Madison Tevlin is a twelve year old girl who loves to sing. And she happens to have Down Syndrome.

Continue reading

adult-baby-hands

Baby girl survives cancer detected before birth

After suffering the loss of a child through miscarriage, Lisa and Anthony Smith were elated to know they were expecting a baby girl. That is, until “joy soon turned to terror” when doctors detected a tennis ball sized tumor on the baby’s neck at 32 weeks.

Lisa expressed how they “were terrified. I couldn’t bear to think of her having cancer as an adult, let alone ­before she was born.”

As a mom, she “just had to pray that she [Jenna] would be able to survive.”

Continue reading

essure

Essure birth control is ruining women’s lives

According to recent news coverage and personal testimonies, hundreds of women have experienced adverse side effects from Essure – “the only non-surgical, permanent birth control available”.

How does it work? Metal coils are inserted in both fallopian tubes, causing a woman’s body to grow tissue through them, blocking the fallopian tubes. In most cases, this prevents pregnancy by making eggs unable to reach the uterus.

But Essure stories aren’t all happily finished families as the product owner, Bayer, would like you to think.

Continue reading

What SWC'ing looks like (Photo: Austin Coalition for Life)

An open letter to abortion clinic clients

Dear ladies walking into abortion clinics,

As you walk in this morning, I just want you to know that we care about you, and that we’re here for you. Yes, us people on the sidewalk. We want you to know that you’re not alone. I can’t speak for the people who are yelling at you. That’s not what I believe in. But for those of us who are here to offer you information on local resources and spend our time talking with you? We care about you.

Continue reading

Zygote-image

Embryonic stem cell research: Setting the record straight

With the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge going around, many people started talking about how they can’t support ALS because embryonic stem cell research kills babies. Other people said that it doesn’t matter because the embryos used for research coming from the IVF process have no hope of living anyway. And others? They said embryos are hardly people, so have at it.

There are all sorts of “facts” being thrown around, so let’s set the record straight with some scientific facts.

Continue reading

KaseyJacksonFamily

Novelist wants new book to cause people to think about abortion

Kasey Jackson is a wife and pro-life advocate who, in the last two years, had twin boys and wrote the newly released pro-life allegorical suspense novel BLUE. The book is written in a a unique histopian genre as it intertwines a fictional story with real-life historical events, namely the implementation of the Termination of Pregnancy Bill in South Africa in 1996.

Jackson believes that “art influences culture” and wanted to reach across the pro-life vs. pro-choice divide through her writing. The original inspiration for the story came “after watching a documentary about the social justice issue of the harvesting of body parts of people with albinism in different areas of Africa.” Her motivation for the story “was to explore the subject of abortion in a way that was approachable from BOTH sides of the debate–pro-life and pro-choice–to hopefully open up a fresh discussion about this issue.”

Continue reading

BDSM and violent sex for underage teens? Some parents say yes

BDSM is a big trend, which is no surprise with the booming response 50 Shades of Grey experienced and the highly anticipated upcoming movie version. What is a big surprise is how nonchalant many American parents view teen involvement with it.

When Live Action’s recent investigative video was released showing a Planned Parenthood counselor giving dangerous and unhealthy advice to a minor, we took to the internet with a tweetfest to bring attention to it.

Continue reading

protect life

America’s inconsistent protection of life

When an abortion is performed, it’s easy to turn a blind eye on what physically happens to the child because we don’t see it happening. It’s a blind procedure, after all, so we don’t see babies being ripped apart and sucked into a vacuum. Unless you worked in the POC (product of conception) lab like Abby Johnson, you don’t see that.

It’s easy to ignore something you can’t see because you can sugar coat it with the phrases “women’s rights” or “reproductive freedom”.

But the same isn’t so when it comes to other life issues.

Continue reading

50-million-names

Website invites public to help give a name to every child lost to abortion

50-million-names

With a death toll of somewhere around 2 million American lives lost in wars, we mourn the lives cut short and honor those who gave the ultimate gift for the freedom of our country. We celebrate their homecoming if there is one, and if there is not we surround their families with love and honor the memory of a life lived for others. We list their names on memorials and remember them in our prayers.

But it’s a completely different story with abortion.

With a toll of over 55 million abortions since 1973, the number of children lost to abortion is astronomically higher than the lives lost in war. That’s not to say that the millions of lives lost in war are insignificant. Both numbers are staggering. But shouldn’t we be honoring all innocent lives lost in our country? Instead of just being a number, children lost to abortion should be remembered as the people they were.

That’s just what Charlotte Ostermann set out to do with her project 50 Million Names.

Continue reading

A-voice-for-brady

Brady Surovik: killed without being a person

A-voice-for-bradyOn July 5th, 2012, Heather Surovik was driving her car with her two young sons and her mother when they were hit by a drunk driver. When she woke up in the ICU, she knew something was wrong when she saw her parents crying. She was right. Her son Brady had been killed in the accident.

But the drunk driver was not charged with Brady’s death.

Why? Because Brady had never taken a breath. Heather was 8 months pregnant and carrying his 8 pound 2 oz perfectly formed body still inside of her while on the way home from her last prenatal appointment before his expected birth. The horrific accident left her injured and took her son, but the law of Colorado did not recognize his life.

Now she’s working to change that.

Continue reading

march-for-life-2014

We marched. Now what?

march-for-life-2014

Coming back from the March for Life is kind of like coming home after a church retreat. But instead of being on a Jesus high, you’re on a saving babies high. And that is awesome. There is no better time than NOW to be excited about joining the pro-life generation in defending and promoting a greater culture of life here in America.

After being in one city with hundreds of thousands of people who also believe in the sanctity of life, I am encouraged and inspired to continue exposing and being a witness to the beauty of each life. To see so many people who are willing to stand in frigid temperatures? It was incredible. And my college was given the honor of leading the march this year, which made it even more unique and inspiring.

Continue reading