4000-years-for-choice-posters

Get involved: Response to the “4000 Years for Choice” Exhibit

4000-years-for-choice-postersWhen I heard the news, I was horrified. The University of Michigan paid for an extremely pro-abortion exhibit called “4000 Years for Choice,” and it’s being displayed—right now—at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. The goal of this exhibit is to make abortion look okay through colorful, artistic posters and “positive” words like affirm, applaud, discover, feel, and praise.

Problem? These words are promptly followed by a twisted history of abortion and contraceptives. For example:

“In 3000 BCE, ancient Egyptians contained a contraceptive recipe numbered Prescription Number 21. It was called Recipe Not To Become Pregnant and called for crocodile feces, mixed with fermented dough, and placed in the vagina.”

“In the mid-1800s, Madame Restelle was one of over 200 abortionists practicing in New York City. Abortion services were largely obtained by middle and upper class women during a time when smaller families were becoming more socially and economically desirable.”

I am not the only person offended by this exhibit. My friends and family, U of M alumni, students, and fans themselves, are angered and disgusted by this flagrant, pro-abortion propaganda. We decided to do something about it.

In response to this awful exhibit, we are coordinating a gathering at the Michigan Diag to hand out information about Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood, through brochures and flyers. The pro-abortion exhibit tries to glorify Ms. Sanger, so we will be distributing the real information about her. For all those who plan to attend, I suggest bringing yourself and a few friends.

Not everyone can come in person, but they can do something to help. If you click on this link, you can see a list of the University of Michigan Board of Regents, as well as their contact information. From now until the day of the silent protest, our goal is to make them understand that this exhibit is unacceptable. Call them and send them letters and emails, sharing your opinion on this matter.

Also, spread the word over social media! We all know how powerful social media is. Let all of your friends know about this issue and how they can respond to it. Share this article and join the Facebook event.

I will be at the Michigan Diag on April 16. (For more information on the details of the day, go here.)

I will be contacting the Board of Regents and making my voice heard.

Who’s with me?

  • Jonathan

    This is absurd and outrageous. In any historic period, men were more desirable than anything else. Their country needed them to fight wars, work in the field and prolonged their families’ bloodline, the more populated, the more prosperous a society was. Also, women were not allowed to vote, study at school or make significant decision. Breeding and nurturing were their top two priorities. They were like their duties to the state and the family. Many of them dropped seven kids or more as they were pregnant throughout their fertile years. They didn’t get to make a choice. Their husbands were in charge of everything.

    • Marauder

      This comment is way too generalized to be accurate – women were not allowed to vote, study in school, or express opinions in public “in any historic period”? You’re taking a basic idea that’s true – women had fewer rights than men in the past – and inflating it to the point of hyperbole. If women weren’t allowed to vote “in any historic period” – *any* historic period, in your words – how have they been allowed to vote in every state in America since 1920? If women weren’t allowed to study in school “in any historic period,” how did Elizabeth Blackwell get into medical school in 1847? If women were pregnant “throughout their fertile years,” why did colonial Massachusetts have both a very low illegitimacy rate and an average age of twenty-three when it came to when women got married for the first time? (The average woman would have had roughly ten fertile years before reproducing,)

      • Jonathan

        My point was about men’s dominance and women’s powerlessness in the past. The exhibition is called “4000 Years for Choice”, but there was no choice in those 4000 years. Whether it was a choice of life or death, it was not up to the women.

        • Marauder

          Which was a totally fine point to make, but when you make these easily disprovable statements, the point runs the risk of getting lost.

  • Basset_Hound

    I’d be willing to bet that if a pro-life group would set up an exhibit about how abortion is degrading to women, the Enlightened Ones would have hissy fits and rip the displays down.

    • Jonathan

      They’re intolerant barbarians, no rationale, no logic.

    • JDC

      I will place a related bet that in such a case the media would of course remain incredibly silent on the matter.

  • PJ4

    Oh look, the pro aborts are fetishizing abortion

  • JDC

    So continues the decline of modern universities.

  • MamaBear

    Honor Diaries, a documentary about things like FGM, child marriages, honor killings was banned at

    • Basset_Hound

      Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and other original advocates for women’s suffrage called abortion a degradation of women .

  • Bridget Walker

    Funny how they use Egypt as a good example. The only good thing about ancient Egypt is that it was destroyed. They didn’t even mention the fact that Egypt was destroyed by a wrathful Pharaoh.

  • Jonathan

    With such propaganda they treat women like idiots as if they care about nothing but having sex and abortion – which allows them to have more sex without any concern.

  • Christina

    I just sent an e-mail out to the entire Board. I pray that at least one person will come to the conviction that killing unborn children is a human rights abuse, and be moved enough to do something about it.

    • Faithkuz

      Can you share the email addresses and maybe the wording you used? (others can follow your lead)

      • Christina

        Sure! The list of e-mail addresses is actually provided in this article, just look over it again and you should find the link to their contact info.

        These are a few excerpts from my letter:
        “I am a college student from ** who has recently been informed of the “4000 Years of Choice” Exhibit at the U of M. Although I respect the free speech of those involved in the production of this exhibit, I have strong concerns for the advocation of a human rights abuse (elective abortion) on a university campus. Universities hold a powerful position in society and can easily sway a society’s moral viewpoint based on its supposed ‘intellectual support.’ Advocation for the intentional murder of a subset of the population may have (and already has) devastating consequences.”

        I then listed several sources about life beginning at conception, disturbing quotes from Margaret Sanger (PP founder), and even a link to Live Action News.

        “I ask you and your colleagues to thoughtfully consider the repercussions of the pro-abortion exhibit. A significant portion of the American population holds that elective abortion is the killing of innocent life. The rising of abortion statistics haunts us as any other death toll, yet we are under strong condemnation for our moral convictions. Please consider our perspective.

        I also hope that you come to a similar conviction and advocate to protect unborn children.

        Thank you for your consideration,
        Christina **”

        Hopefully that helps!

  • MamaBear

    So, did the croc poop work? Maybe it would be safer than modern hormonal birth control. They could advertise it as “all natural.”

  • JDC

    Glad to hear it. I wish you the best of luck in starting the conversation.

    • Faithkuz

      Given the timing, I may also hand each a choolate egg but with an attached definition from embryology texts showing when life begins (an no such thing as a “fertilized egg”).

      • JDC

        That’s a great, and delicious, idea!

        • Faithkuz

          It was : )
          Most students are pro-life and students generally are Very easy to engage in dialogue, esp. about complex issues (though always respectfully recognizing everyone needs to mull over new information and process it and that often takes more than one conversation.