Horrific new story of forced abortion in China has implications for Americans


What kind of culture do we live in when we’re told that ending an innocent life is “the responsible thing to do”?

Earlier this month, a Chinese mother of three, Song Ping’an, was kidnapped from her home by the Family Planning Police (yes, that is a thing) and injected with a drug that caused her third child to be born dead. She was six months pregnant.

The trauma of the forced abortion led to a mental breakdown. Song was left in a “trance-like” state, according to, unable to care for herself or her two surviving daughters.

Officially, China banned these late-term abortions back in July. Unofficially, it looks like they haven’t banned them hard enough.

Many abortion advocates, in the media and probably even in the comments below this blog, will condemn China for this, and condemn Live Action for even bringing it up. “This is not what pro-choice is about!” they will say. “This poor woman did not have a choice at all!”

But guess what else they will say?

“How dare you call us pro-abortion? No one wants an abortion!”

“How dare you demonize the women who make this heart-wrenching choice? No one wants an abortion!”

“All women should have the right to choose, but no one denies that it is a difficult choice to make. No one wants an abortion!”

I submit to you, dear readers, that many American women who “choose” abortion are not too terribly different from Song Ping’an.

We are told, by people who call themselves pro-“choice,” that a pregnant girl who is 16 and immature and has crappy parents and no support system has only one responsible choice. We are told that a pregnant single woman who is on welfare and has four kids has only one responsible choice. We are told that a pregnant medical student with her career and a life full of success and marriage and “real” babies ahead of her has only one responsible choice. We are told that a woman pregnant with the child of a rapist has only one conceivable choice.

In other words, we are told, over and over, that certain women don’t really have much of a choice.

Neither did Song Ping’an.

Song Ping’an wanted her child to live, but do any women, save a few psychopaths, want their children to die? Don’t the majority of abortive women believe they aren’t killing a child, but ridding their bodies of a “clump of cells”? Isn’t that the reason abortion clinics use phrases like “terminating a pregnancy”?

Song Ping’an was forced to abort physically, bodily, overtly, by evil agents of an evil and tyrannical state.

American women, in our land of the free, are too often forced to abort softly, covertly, by having their natural moral compass subsumed by a culture of death. They are told, by television shows, movies, books, their professors, and sometimes their parents and friends – who have been similarly corrupted – that ending a life is the only responsible thing to do.

With a Planned Parenthood clinic in most poor neighborhoods in most major cities, how far are we from China? In America, abortion doesn’t come get you. It convinces you to come to it, with warm, colorful, interracial ad campaigns and friendly slogans. “We’re here to help you. We care about your health. We know you want to do the right thing. You’re a good person. You’re a responsible person. Let us take care of  your problem. We can make it go away.”

We are beginning to see around us a country where teen mothers are seen as trashy failures, post-abortive teens responsible and forward-thinking.

We must ask ourselves, honestly: do women want to kill their babies? Do they honestly understand their options? Are they truly – truly – choosing abortion, fully aware of what it is, what it does to them, what it does to the child?

I do not intend to downplay the horror of what happened to Song Ping’an and other victims of Chinese forced abortion. But unless we want to become like China, we have to understand that in its way, every abortion is a forced abortion.

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