Investigative

Low-dose birth control requires Rx while abortion-causing drug Plan B available on Amazon

Plan B

Amazon has recently made the morning-after pill Plan B, a so-called emergency contraceptive, available online. For about $20, anyone can have an abortion-inducing drug with high doses of contraceptive hormones shipped right to their door step. (And when we say “anyone,” that includes statutory rapists who want to use the drug on young victims without their consent.)

On the other hand, to obtain low-dose hormonal birth control pills, you’ll have to schedule a doctor’s appointment, be examined, and obtain a prescription. According to Students for Life of America, an organization working to expose the dangers and victimizing potential of Plan B’s unrestricted availability:

Despite being more powerful than the birth control pill (which requires a doctor’s exam) the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved “Plan B” (the morning after pill) for sale “behind the counter,” to anyone 17 and older in 2009. Following the order of a U.S. District Court Judge in April of 2013, the FDA announced this June that the drug should be sold “over the counter,” on store shelves, to anyone of any age.

Plan B has a few modes of operation, primarily to stop ovulation from occurring and leading to fertilization. However, this is not Plan B’s sole mode of operation. The drug — and all other forms of emergency contraception — not only prevent pregnancies — it has the potential –according to current research– to end them as well. If fertilization occurs before the ingestion of Plan B, the drug has abortifacient qualities which will cause the woman’s body to expel a newly-conceived human embryo.

As we’ve discussed in the past, the abortion movement and its ilk have devised semantic games (which have gotten more elaborate with time) to circumvent the reality of this fact. They argue that “pregnancy” doesn’t exist until after an embryo implants in its mother’s uterus (which is false), and therefore, Plan B can’t be an abortifacient. One of the sellers even states that the drug “will not harm an existing pregnancy.”

But the facts of science are inescapable: the FDA itself slapped a warning right onto the drug saying that it has the ability to cause an abortion (specifically, it “may inhibit implantation”). Spanish language marketing for the drug on Amazon is also deceptive. It lists the drug as a “piladora de emergencia para evitar un embarazo” — an emergency pill to avoid pregnancy. There is no mention of its modes of operation, including its ability to cause abortion, in English or Spanish.

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