Analysis

NARAL lies about which drugs SCOTUS ruled on in Hobby Lobby case

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NARAL added to its tidy collection of lies today when the group released a meme that juxtaposed Viagra and a pack of regular, hormonal birth control pills. Over the picture of Viagra was stamped the word “Covered.” Over the picture of the pack of birth control pills were stamped the words, “Not covered.” Why does this matter? Because it’s a lie that many pro-abortion advocates believe, and are spreading throughout social media with abandon.

So let’s set the record straight: Today’s SCOTUS ruling did NOT ban low-dose hormonal contraceptives (although a strong case can be made for the abortifacient qualities of those). The ruling did NOT ban any normal form of contraception. Today’s ruling in favor of Hobby Lobby simply exempted the company, and others with similar objections, to covering abortion-causing drugs and devices. These are so-called “emergency contraceptives,” and they’re normally used after unprotected sex to prevent a pregnancy from occurring, or expel one that has begun. Specifically, the Hobby Lobby case dealt with four: Ella, Plan B, and two IUDs. (By the way, this and this are what the two drugs in question look like.)

These four drugs and devices — which even the pro-abortion Mother Jones cites — are all capable of causing abortions in addition to acting as normal contraceptives. It’s a mode of action that some other contraceptives do not have. (Others likely do have this action, but the four chosen by Hobby Lobby have been particularly proven.) This is why the Green family of Hobby Lobby and the Hahn family of Conestoga Wood objected to providing them free of charge to employees. The abortion lobby continues to gain throngs of supporters who are outraged by a misnomer, that the Supreme Court banned contraception. This is so far from the truth as to be laughable.

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