Analysis

Planned Parenthood laments having to rely on abortion ‘circuit riders’ to kill babies in Nebraska

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It seems Planned Parenthood of the Heartland has a hiring problem. The Norfolk Daily News reports Sunday on the difficult the abortion giant is having keeping an abortion doctor employed.

Earlier this year,  Dr. C.J. LaBenz, their abortionist, left, as Live Action reported in April. Planned Parenthood’s Omaha and Lincoln clinics were left without a regular abortionist.

Lest the baby killing be left undone, Planned Parenthood, the organization always begging for money, flies an abortion doctor from  Massachusetts to Nebraska. However, he or she can only abort on a part-time basis; therefore, Planned Parenthood of the Heartland now kills babies five days a month instead of the usual eight. Apparently this has created a rush on abortion scheduling.

Angie Remington, a Planned Parenthood representative, said:

“It has been challenging to meet the need for abortion services at our Nebraska health centers. We are booking out two weeks in advance.”

The story continues:

“But the situation illustrates a difficulty facing abortion clinics in much of the country: finding physicians qualified to do abortions and willing to brave the threats, harassment and legal battles that come with the job.

“’It takes a really passionate, committed person to step into that role,’ Remington said.”

And even though the National Abortion Federation (NAF) insists there is not a provider shortage, they also say the majority of providers are in urban areas, which begs the question of how passionate and committed these doctors are to the alleged help they provide. Wouldn’t someone who cared deeply for women go serve them in rural Nebraska? Instead someone has to be flown in, likely at premium prices, from the east coast, or women have to be sent to Des Moines, IA, hours away.

Meanwhile, the abortion providers use “circuit-rider” abortionists to fill the gap.  Of course it’s a ludicrous notion that a hired killer could be on par with a traveling minister who brought revival and repentance to areas, such as the true circuit riders did. But this is a reflection on the abortion industry’s arrogance that it provides a service rather than a murder.

Meanwhile, the NAF says another hindrance exists in Nebraska–the law.  The story reports:

“’Nebraska has been fairly hostile to abortion providers and to abortion care in many ways,’”[Vicki Saporta, president and CEO of the NAF] said. She noted that the state was the first to ban abortions at 20 weeks and has banned the use of telemedicine for drug-induced abortions.”

This perceived hindrance is an excellent argument for pro-life laws and legislation. Nebraska has made it difficult for abortions to thrive —so they aren’t. Surely some women will go through with it anyhow, but many others are likely to rethink the decision when they are forced into the time and effort it takes. That’s why the abortion industry hates all the safety laws and waiting periods; it knows that a number of women will reconsider if they are actually given time to think.

That time may be the time it takes an abortionist to fly from Massachusetts to Nebraska.

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