Analysis

Planned Parenthood: We care more about headlines than the law

vanderhei, planned parenthood, headlines, disaster

Scandal-ridden Planned Parenthood has admitted to yet another core problem: they care more about the headlines than the law.

In today’s new video, “Planned Parenthood Federation of America’s Criminal Enterprise,” top Planned Parenthood officials discuss the utter importance of what the New York Times has to say about them.

This concern is vocalized as being more important than the law, than what the clinics actually do, and, by connection, more important than the women they claim to “Care. No Matter What.” about.

Deb VanDerhei, National Director for the Consortium of Planned Parenthood Abortion Providers (CAPS) explained that Planned Parenthood lacks a complete national policy – intentionally so – on baby body part sales. Describing the little bit of policy they do have, she said:

…the policy that we do have suggests that you just really think about what you’re doing, vet your procurement service, and, um, if there’s any way you can do it mission-based, that’s probably better. And that if you do decide that you want to engage in remuneration, that you really need to, like think that through. And think, “New York Times headline,” when you’re creating your policy.

vanderhei, planned parenthood

There is noticeably a lack of focus on following the law in Planned Parenthood’s little bit of national policy. “Mission-based”? What about “law-based”? “Think that through”? What about “read the law and follow it”?

But no, it’s the “New York Times headline” that matters above all else. In fact, according to VanDerhei, policy should be set with the New York Times in mind – never mind the law.

Astoundingly, with this advice swirling around the top levels of Planned Parenthood, Cecile Richards still has the gall to write to Congress, assuring them that Planned Parenthood follows the law and the highest ethics.

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VanDerhei again emphasized the need to consider the headlines (not the law):

If they [the PP clinics] do it, that’s fine. We’re not going to say no. But we want them to think about really, the New York Times headline.

vanderhei, new york times, planned parenthood

Vanessa Russo, Compliance Program Administrator for Planned Parenthood Keystone in Pennsylvania, had a discussion on tape with VanDerhei. She advocated, quite blatantly, for disregarding the law. Despite the federal prohibition on selling aborted baby body parts, Russo clearly believed her own logic was elevated above the “ridiculous” laws:

[D]o you like, a company like this that wants to, wants to give our organization money for the tissue, I think that that’s a valid exchange. And that that’s okay.

russo, planned parenthood, law

Despite short mentions of being “very sensitive to the patient and the consent” and that PP clinics should “do it right,” the overall theme of the conversations was clear: media headlines matter most. The law matters very little – if at all. Russo included it in her definition of “crap:”

Russo, planned parenthood

VanDerhei demonstrated this theme best, perhaps when she revealed the viewpoint of PP’s top attorney:

Because Roger [Evans, head of PPFA Litigation & Law] said I’m going to say a number of things, and I only want you to go away with one message: I think this is a good idea. Now here’s what you need to look out for, and at the end of it, he said, “And I just want to reiterate, I think this is a good idea.”

vanderhei, roger evans, planned parenthood, law

This is corruption at its finest. The law be damned, quite literally, because “this is a good idea.”

vanderhei, planned parenthood, roger evans, law

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