Skip to content
Published: April 26, 2012 5:14 pm to Opinion Column

The deception of population control: MLK Jr.’s mistake and the “heroism” of Bill Gates

“Words are inadequate for me to say how honored I was to be the recipient of the Margaret Sanger Award. This award will remain among my most cherished possessions.” -Martin Luther King, Jr.

The quotation is from a 1966 letter Dr. King wrote to Cass Canfield, chairman of the Executive Committee of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America’s “World Population Emergency Campaign.” Civil rights commitments kept Dr. King from attending the prestigious ceremony, as did illness for Sanger. King sent his wife Coretta to offer a message on his behalf. The acceptance speech, titled “Family Planning – A Special and Urgent Concern,” was full of glowing praise for the work of Sanger and Planned Parenthood.

King wrote:

There is a striking kinship between our movement and Margaret Sanger’s early efforts. She, like we, saw the horrifying conditions of ghetto life. Like we, she knew that all of society is poisoned by cancerous slums. Like we, she was a direct actionist — a nonviolent resister. She was willing to accept scorn and abuse until the truth she saw was revealed to the millions.

King had likely never read a copy of Sanger’s Dec. 10, 1939 letter to Dr. Clarence Gamble, commenting on the plans for her “Negro Project.”

“[We propose to] hire three or four colored ministers, preferably with social-service backgrounds, and with engaging personalities. The most successful educational approach to the Negro is through a religious appeal. And we do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population, and the minister is the man who can straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.” -Margaret Sanger

King fit the bill as a Planned Parenthood puppet. He was genuinely concerned for the welfare of his people yet unaware of the organization’s hidden agenda. He bought into the twisted ideology that destroys the very people group he fought to protect. As his niece and pro-life activist Alveda King said:

Dr. King was not aware that the population control agenda aimed primarily at Negroes during his lifetime, included sterilization, abortion, and chemical birth control that would ultimately be linked to stroke, heart attack and breast cancer. He was mislead to believe that he would be “helping his people.” Such help would lead to mass genocide.

King showed signs of being against abortion. Pro-life leader Ryan Bomberger wrote, “In an advice column he wrote for Ebony magazine, from 1957-1958, King recognized the wrong of abortion in a response to a young man who compelled his girlfriend to the crime. He advised, in part: ‘One can never rectify a mistake until he admits that a mistake has been made.’”

Dr. King knew that some people in society feared a growing black population. He wrote:

Some commentators point out that with present birth rates it will not be long before Negroes are a majority in many of the major cities of the nation. As a consequence, they can be expected to take political control, and many people are apprehensive at this prospect.

Yet he strangely believed Planned Parenthood’s concerns for growth stemmed from compassion:

They (Negroes) are instinctively sympathetic to all who offer methods that will improve their lives and offer them fair opportunity to develop and advance as all other people in our society. For these reasons we are natural allies of those who seek to inject any form of planning in our society that enriches life and guarantees the right to exist in freedom and dignity.

Time would reveal that King’s allies were closer to enemies. In a interview on the history of Roe v. Wade, Supreme Court Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg admitted:

Frankly, I had thought that at the time Roe was decided, there was concern about population growth and particularly growth in populations that we don’t want to have too many of.

Martin saw Planned Parenthood in the same light as many do today. The organization was backed by the wealthy elite and seemed to shine as a savior to poor, downtrodden minorities. That’s part of the reason why people admire Bill and Melinda Gates. Bill pours millions into aiding underdeveloped countries while Melinda is on a mission to bring family planning and birth control to the poor of the earth. As the Gates Foundation 2012 annual letter proclaims, “[t]he idea is that as parents bring their family size down, countries can invest more in educating young people.”

They warn us:

Over the next 40 years, the global population is projected to grow at just .8 percent per year. It just passed 7 billion and will reach 9.3 billion by 2050, according to the United Nations’ medium estimate. However, the populations of most poor countries, which have the hardest time feeding and educating their citizens, will more than double between now and 2050. If we compare population by continent now and in 2050, we see that Africa will more than double in population (from 1 billion to 2.2 billion) while Asia and the Americas will grow by 25 percent and Europe will hardly grow at all!

Isn’t that interesting? Africa could double in population, and Europe might not grow at all! Not if the Gates can help it. Bill continues:

Nigeria, which has the biggest population in Africa, will grow from 163 million to 392 million—an increase of 140 percent. This will likely make the lives of people in that very poor country even more difficult. Melinda and I believe, though, that if the right steps are taken—not just helping women plan their families but also investing in reducing child mortality and increasing nutrition—populations in countries like Nigeria will grow significantly less than projected. Almost all the foundation’s global programs focus on goals that will help with this.

He may have a comic book, but that doesn’t make him a hero. The Gates goals are conveniently aligned with Planned Parenthood’s. Not surprising, as Aaron Dyke points out:

Bill Gates’ real legacy is that of a second generation eugenicist committed to lowering the global population. His father, William Gates, Sr., has long been on the national board for Planned Parenthood and numerous other depopulation efforts, including financial donations and board positions at PATH (Program for Appropriate Technology in Health), the Alan Guttmacher Institute, the Department of Population Dynamics at Johns Hopkins University and, of course, the United Nations. The family are de facto captains of the Rockefeller-founded health-related eugenics operations, now in full continuation through targeted, global stealth kill programs, updated for the 21st Century by the world’s first voluntarily dethroned richest man in the world. Bill Gates the younger made clear his goal to lower the population through vaccines at his infamous 2010 TED talk.

A season in Mozambique, Africa and a visit to Nepal in 2010 opened my eyes to the plight of the poor in third-world nations. I wholeheartedly support efforts for clean water, nutrition, education, housing, and positive forms of social justice. What I will never support is a eugenics-based birth control/abortion movement that disguises itself as a friend to the people it plots to systematically eliminate.

I believe that Martin Luther King, Jr. cared deeply for the black population. There are countless others who have a similar call to help both the African-American community and those in Africa. However, as LifeNews states, the call for population control is a “false alarm.” There are real crises throughout our world, but the answer will be found not in killing or preventing life from taking place. If we take that road, we will end up at the same conclusion Hitler did. Wrap it in a pretty bow and call it a gift to the poor, but eugenics’ final aim is clear – decrease an undesirable population.

I refuse to repeat Dr. King’s mistake. The answer to solving poverty’s ills is never found in the elimination of the poor.

About Christina Martin

Christina Martin has been a pro-life voice for eight years. Her work began after her mother confessed she paid a doctor to abort her, but walked out before he could. Knowing she was saved from death, she wanted to fight for others. After graduating college in 2005, Christina spent 2 years at the Justice House of Prayer in D.C praying at the Supreme Court daily for the ending of abortion. Then 3 years with the Atlanta chapter of the international grassroots pro-life movement Bound4Life. Christina seeks to love Jesus in word and deed. She has a burden for the black community and longs to see them free from the genocide of abortion.
View all posts by Christina Martin

  • Rainydayjamie88

    This article is not well written and makes assumptions which are taken from quotes out of context. Eugenics is definitely wrong, and there is no doubt that the black population has suffered from this kind of abuse. Sterilizations were illegally done up until the seventies and are a black stain on the US medical system. 

    However, supporting African mothers who do not want to give birth to more and more children who they cannot feed and die in infancy of famine, malnutrition and disease is not eugenics. Many don’t have access or are not educated on birth control, some even being the product of rape and violence. So sure, Bill Gates is a villan for helping support their decisions. Does that mean impoverished women should not focus on bettering her life and keeping her other children alive in a country that is corrupted and quickly becoming over-populated? It is crazy how people on this site believe so harshly in quantity over quality of life.  PS Unfortunately Margaret Sanger did believe in racial superiority but so did most prominent people at that time. This view is scientifically and morally wrong, but historically it was uncommon not to believe in white superiority. Her quote is taken out of context. The reason the black community accepted her was because she, though inherently racist like the majority of whites at the time, treated leaders and staff as equals, encouraging them to fill positions. She was not perfect by any means but historical evidence does not support your argument. Also, she didn’t believe in abortion, only contreceptives. She was PRO-LIFE.

    • Christina Martin

      I’m not sure what your definition of “pro-life” is, but I know Margaret Sanger does not fit into mine. If she was alive today, I doubt she’d even identity herself in that way. She didn’t push abortion because she felt America wasn’t ready for it yet. Instead she pushed birth control and contraceptives, which opened the door for abortion. Her writings reveal an attitude of hatred towards the feeble minded, disabled, weak, poor, minorities, and large families. Her agenda was to rid the nation of “undesirable” people. Birth control was her answer to assisting the poor. Sadly, birth control, contraceptives and abortion are seen as a means to helping the poor throughout the nations. I do believe improvised women should focus on bettering themselves. I do want children to have quality lives. I want millionaires like Bill Gates and others to pour funds into Africa. Just not in an effort to control and reduce their population. They can build schools, dig wells, feed the poor, teach widows skills to support themselves,etc. That is the type of help that can strengthen and build a nation. The answer to poverty in the nations is not to reduce the children, it’s to feed, care, and support them.

    • Christina Marie Martin

      Thanks for your response. I do agree with you that Eugenics is wrong. However, I’m not sure what your definition of “pro-life” is. I know Margaret Sanger does not fit into mine. If she was alive today, I doubt she’d even identity herself in that way. She didn’t push abortion because she felt America wasn’t ready for it yet. Instead she pushed birth control and contraceptives, which opened the door for abortion. Her writings reveal an attitude of hatred towards the feeble minded, disabled, weak, poor, minorities, and large families. Her agenda was to rid the nation of “undesirable” people. Birth control was her answer to assisting the poor…or preventing the poor. She didn’t want people ” reproducing after their kind”. Sadly, birth control, contraceptives and abortion are seen as a means to helping the poor throughout the nations. I do believe improvised women should focus on bettering themselves. I do want children to have quality lives. I want millionaires like Bill Gates and others to pour funds into Africa. Just not in an effort to control and reduce their population. They can build schools, dig wells, feed the poor, teach widows skills to support themselves,etc. That is the type of help that can strengthen and build a nation. The answer to poverty in the nations is not to reduce the children, it’s to feed, care, and support them.

      • macatcas

        The irony of eliminating the poor of countries in the Third World for the sake of managing and husbanding world resources is that the poor use and waste a fraction of the world’s resources and live “green” lives much closer to the Earth than anyone in highly industrialized countries. If we are going to “preserve the Earth” for future generations as heroically as our rich, powerful, well-educated classes suggest, then perhaps the real solution would be to eliminate US, not the people of Africa, or any other poor region.. Not being suicidally inclined, I would rather we begin to respect one another and equitably share resources, education and technology in a manner that reflects a Christ-like willingness to serve and sacrifice and yes, even suffer (something few comfy, well-educated people care to do) for the love a Creator who made us in His Own image.

  • Beckerroscow

    Christina — don’t you think education is the key especially education for girls?  It seems like the societies where education for both sexes is equal (or least mostly equal) the whole society benefits. 

    • Christina Marie Martin

      I do think education is an important part of it. I think we need to give children a truly comprehensive education. One that can meet their emotional and spiritual needs as well. I think young girls need to be taught their value and worth. It’s easy for people to pass out birth control, and it’s also easy to just say don’t have sex. People have done both for a while, and look at where were at. We need church leaders, teachers, community leaders, parents who will step in and invest time into children’s lives. The nations need this. 

  • empireindecline

    I would love to have the opportunity to sit down and have a meaningful conversation with Ms. Martin, but I’m pretty sure that will never happen.  I am a Christian with conservative political views. I abhor abortion for any reason. I realize that Catholics view birth control as a bad thing and I would not begin to try to convince them otherwise. I know that many people with “good intentions” believe that working people can support anyone and everyone who chooses NOT to work.  There are people who are satisfied to be leaches and who DESERVE everything at someone else’s expense. The bible does not condone that kind of behavior. If a man or woman cannot provide for children, they should not continue to propagate indiscriminately. Today I was told of a young black minister in NC who sited a case that he knows of personally  wherein a woman produced 10 children out of wedlock, never being supported by the fathers. She drew public assistance for all her children and lived in public housing. Now some of her 10 children AND their children are also living in their own public housing. HOW does Ms. Martin think that this can be sustained indefinitely.  This kind of behavior will crush the life out of WORKING people. Slothfulness is a sin. If Ms. Martin has a “burden for the black community” perhaps she should try teaching them about slothfulness. If they do not believe in active birth control, try abstinence.

    • Christina Marie Martin

      I’d love to have a meaningful conversation with you. I can’t sit down with you but we could email back and forth. If you would like to discuss these things in more depth my email is Christina.Martin@ihop-atlanta.com  God bless you :) 

  • Daniel Lewis

    Hey Christina, you should come to the African American Life Rumble in Fredericksburg va the day before Awaken The Dawn and then The Call Va! Check it out at theprayerfurnace.org. We could probably even find somewhere for you to stay here in Fredericksburg. If you would like to email me my email is Daniel.lewis@theprayerfurnace.org.

    • Christina Marie Martin

      I’m coming :) I’m going to be speaking at the Rumble! 

  • Pingback: If only I wasn’t born black…

  • Pingback: Moments with Alveda King and tearful prayers for Inauguration Day

  • Gus Penton

    So you don’t think without population control life as we know it is sustainable?