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Unsung heroes and “It’s a Wonderful Life”

Early Saturday morning, my boyfriend and I drove to an abortion clinic in a nearby city. It was his first time coming with me to pray outside a clinic and do sidewalk counseling. The weather called for a blizzard later in the day, so we went all bundled up. I filled my coat pockets with pamphlets describing the beauty of life and the dangers of abortion. When we arrived at the clinic, there was one pro-life man standing outside. The snow was lightly falling, and the streets were bare.

Gradually people began to come by. A few faithful Catholic prayer warriors joined us in our stand. The clinic sadly brought in its business. Men and women walked by us, hurrying to enter their doors. We gave out literature, pleaded with them to listen, but to no avail. We earnestly prayed. I asked God to save the lives of the children and soften the hearts of the parents. I prayed for the doctors, nurses, and staff workers to let truth prevail over the lies.

I had the pleasure of talking with a woman who was waiting for her friend to have an abortion. When I asked why she came, her response was, “To support my friend.” I told her that a far better way to support her friend was to tell her to let her child live. I spoke of the purpose of her child’s life and how valuable she was in the eyes of God. The woman promised to go into the clinic and talk with her friend.

Towards the end of our time, I met two older pro-life women in their seventies. Betty and Della had both been reaching out to people outside abortion clinics for over thirty years. Della had been doing it for thirty-seven years. Betty told me of her husband of over 50 years, who is no longer on the earth. She looked at my boyfriend and told us her husband had always supported her in pro-life work. Betty shared with us the story of a baby she helped save over twenty years ago. Betty was able to take the mother to the hospital when she was in labor, and she was one of the first people who got to hold the child. Betty stayed a part of the child’s life, and now this 21-year-old man considers her a family friend. When Della found out my name was Christina, it brought to mind the name of a baby girl she helped save many years ago. Christina is now a nurse who works at a nearby hospital in the city.

I cherished the stories these courageous women told me. For over thirty years, they have sacrificed early mornings, received harassment, endured bad weather conditions, and done it all with hearts of love. What 70-plus-year-old would stand outside in 30-degree weather for hours trying to reach strangers? Betty, Della, and other older pro-life warriors are my heroes. Their lives are a lesson about commitment, devotion, and persevering faith. It’s not about politics, money, fame, or an agenda for these humble saints. They do it all for love.

Later in the day, as the blizzard came down upon us, my boyfriend, mother, and I watched It’s a Wonderful Life. We’d tried to watch it before Christmas but never got to it. Since we were trapped in by the snowy weather, it was a perfect time to watch this beloved holiday film.

its_a_wonderful_life_stortIt’s a Wonderful Life is a story of George Bailey, a hardworking, loyal man who sacrifices his personal dreams to help the lives of others. When the cares of life overwhelm him and despair grips his heart, he attempts to take his life. An angel named Clarence intervenes, and George tells him that he wishes he had never been born. George’s prayer is answered, and he gets to see a world where he never existed.

Watching George get a glimpse of life without him is a sobering reminder of the millions of lives that have been lost through abortion. George realizes that his life has touched the lives of so many in his family and community. After seeing the negative effects of a world without him, he asks Clarence to bring him back to his normal life. The movie closes with George holding his daughter, embracing his wife, and receiving the support he needed from the ones who love him.

After the movie ended, my mother extended her arms to me and gave me a big hug. The movie made her shudder, as she imagined what life would be like if she had aborted me. She expressed her gratefulness for having me in her life.

MSN news released an article titled “Those we lost in 2012.” The article gives a list of “notable” deaths that includes Whitney Houston, Neil Armstrong, and Arlen Specter. As a nation, we love to remember and mourn the loss of the famous, talented, and beautiful among us.

What if we mourned all the unborn who have been lost in 2012? Let’s think about the children who never had the chance to make their mark on the world. If only mothers and fathers could understand the message It’s a Wonderful Life brings. If only the citizens of our nation could take action, like Betty and Della have done for thirty years.

Every life is valuable and precious. We can never measure the impact an individual will have on this earth. Like Clarence said to George in the film, “Strange, isn’t it? Each man’s life touches so many other lives. When he isn’t around he leaves an awful hole, doesn’t he?” I agree with the angel. With over 55 million lives lost in America alone, we are missing more than we’ll ever know. Let’s follow Betty’s and Della’s example and do what it takes to save lives.

  • Lydia

    Good for you, Christina. I wanted to encourage you as you continue in your good work. God bless you and the others who are likewise engaged. Thank you.

  • Joe walker

    May God continue to bless your work fighting for the unborn, these killings of the unborn must be stopped!!!