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Viral Facebook video shows remarkable mother-child bond in-utero

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A viral Facebook video by scientist Hashem Al-Ghaili shows the remarkable power of the mother-child bond in the womb. Posted on Mother’s Day, the video already had well over 30 million views within two days. “Mothers and Their Babies” is a striking look at the reality of life in the womb, and it includes research that flies in the face of every abortion argument that tries to discount the lives of preborn babies.

The video illustrates some significant scientific findings, such as how the in-utero child helps repair the mother’s heart if it is injured.

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Al-Ghaili’s video also notes the power of language acquisition in-utero, as well as vowel perception after birth that was acquired in the womb.

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It comes as no surprise to any mother that a preborn baby responds to the mother’s touch, and even responds back with movements.

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The video also highlights some remarkable things such as the transfer of immunity from mother to child. But perhaps most notable in the video is the information on research findings that mothers produce breast milk differently depending on if they have a daughter or a son.

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The findings are so stunning that one might be tempted to think maybe there’s some sensationalism here, perhaps a pro-lifer trying to use some emotional convincing. However, Al-Ghaili, who has done advanced graduate work in molecular biotechnology and has authored scientific research, also cites the peer-reviewed journals from which he gained his information to make the video.

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Once again, science proves that the mother-child bond is not merely a chosen bond if a mother “wants” to have a baby, but it is one that is so unique that they support each other’s health even while the baby is growing in the womb.

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